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David Selleck
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David Selleck

Sources

Birth

Selleck and Peck Genealogy
Author: William Edwin Selleck
Published: Chicago, Illinois: Privately Printed, Jul 1912.
p.11.
His business was soap boiler. He probably came from Bristol, England. The manufacture of soap in Bristol was a very important business. In 1851 Book of New England Historical and Genealogical Register, page 400, will be found where Christopher Gibson sope boyler moved to Boston, probably in 1646, as in that year he bought of David Selleck half of all belonging to his trade.

Death

\i Bulletin of the Stamford Genealogical Society\i0, newsletter
[vol 19, Sep 1976, pp.31-33]

Reprinted from THE MAYFLOWER QUARTERLY
February 1976

Pilgrim Ancestors ...
Brown-Groover, Pilgrim Ancestors of Revolutionary Soldiers, Volume 19 (September 1976): p. 33.

Full Source Text

\i Bulletin of the Stamford Genealogical Society\i0, newsletter
[vol 19, Sep 1976, pp.31-33]

Reprinted from THE MAYFLOWER QUARTERLY
February 1976

Pilgrim Ancestors of Revolutionary Soldiers
No. 6 - The Selleck Family of CT, NY, GA and SC
By Mary-Agnes Brown-Groover
A.B., LL. B. S.J.D.

[Note at bottom of page: Mrs. Groover is a descendant of Isaac Allerton and a member of the D.C. Mayflower Society. Her husband, the late Gordon L. Groover, M.D., was a descendant of Aurelia Selleck. The author has been a member of the bar of D.C. and the Supreme Court, and is a Lt. Col., Army Reserver, retired. She served in the Pacific in charge of the WAC during WWII and received the Legion of Merit.]

FREDERICK[6] SELLECK was born in 1755 to Gershom and Puella (Gorham) Selleck of Stamford, Fairfield County, CT. Puella, sometimes called Priscilla, was a fifth generation descendant of John Howland and Elizabeth Tilley of the Mayflower. In 1757 Gershom moved his family to Salem NY where, presumably, their daughter Charlotte was born in 1763. In 1777 the Sellecks were living in South Salem NY, in Westchester County, just over the line from Ridgefield CT. This county suffered severely during the Revolution. The whole southern part was marked by the marches, works of defense, or skermishes and battles of the armies. In 1784, Charlotte married Stephen Fitch who died in 1848, son of Bushnell Fitch.

Frederick Selleck and his father Gershom received pay for service in the Revolutionary War as enlisted men in Crane's Regiment of the New York Militia for Westchester County, which is located on Long Island Sound. On 12 July, 1785, Frederick acknowledged receipt from Thadeus Crane of [pounds]5 11s. 6d. as settlement in full for his services. Military records also show two levy certificates delivered to Fradrick Sillick on 26 Aug. 1785, one for [pounds]18 4s. 4d. on orders of Gershon Sillick, the other for [pounds]7 17s. 10d. on orders of Abraham Hanford. The ranks which father and son held and their specific military services are not known. The U.S. Adjutant General has stated that Frederick and Gershom Selleck are the only soldiers of those names found to have served in the Revolution.

After the war, Gershom returned to Fairfield County CT where he was recorded as a family head in the first U.S. Census, 1790. About this time, Frederick married Esther Hanford, daughter of Theophilus and Keziah Hanford. Esther was born in New Canaan CT, 27 Mar. 1760 and was a descendant of Thomas Hanford. Frederick and Esther had a son Frederick William[7] born 26 June 1791, and a daughter Aurelia born about 1797.

On 30 Sept. 1791 Frederick Sillick was appointed a lieutenant of the state militia group in newly formed Herkimer County, in the middle of New York state, and on 25 Sept. 1793 he was appointed a captain-lieutenant of a troop of horse for the company. His name also comes up in the militia records on 25 Mar. 1797.

Census records show Frederick and his family residing in Rome NY in 1800. The 1810 census does not show the Sellecks probably because both he and Esther died prior to that date. The town of Rome occupied the site of Fort Stanwix which was built in 1758 and repaired in 1777 to protect the valuable Mohawk Valley in eastern NY from the British.

In 1815, orphans Frederick[7] Selleck, aged 24, and Aurelia aged 19, were living with relatives in Savannah. Both married and left descendants in Georgia. Aurelia married Dr. John Bryant Greene of Screven Co. GA 13 April 1815 and had nine children.

A son of Frederick[7] served in the Mexican War - on 13 Sept. 1847, Lt. Frederick W. Selleck of the famed Palmetto Regiment, raised the first American flag over the City of Mexico, sustaining serious wounds as he did so. A monument was erected in his honor by his Captain, Foster Marshall, in Abbeville SC, and his portrait was hung in the State House in Columbia.

p. 33
David Selleck (1654-)
John Selleck (1643 - )
Nathaniel Selleck (1678-1712) Susanna Kibby ()
David Selleck (1700 -) Sarah Law (1639 - )
Gersham Selleck (1730-c1790) Sarah Lockwood (1678 - )
Mercy Waterbury ()

Frederick Selleck ( - c1800)

Puella Gorham (1730 - c1790) married Gersham Selleck 1750.

[The rest of the tree I already know. SSJ 02/21/2011]

References
Adjutant General, War Dept., letter of 20 July 1942 filed at NSDR Lib. DC under Selleck Family - CT and NY.
Barber and Howe, Historical Collections of the State of New York, 1841, pp. 366-370, 584.
Bolton, History of the County of Westchester, p. 281.
Golding, A.C., Descendants of Rev. Thomas Hanford, 1936, p. 20.
Hastings, Military Minutes of the Council of Appointments for the State of NY 1783-1821, Albany, 1901, pp. 206, 242, 392.
Huntington, Stamford Births, Marriages and Deaths, p. 38.
Ibid, History of Stamford, p. 184.
NSDAR Archives, DC, Gersham and Frederick Selleck Data submitted June 1942 by V.M.N. Black, DAR No. 254, 278.
Roberts, New York in the Revolution as Colony and State, 2nd ed., Albany 1898, p. 216.
Selleck, Rev. C.M., Norwalk, p. 200
Selleck, Wm. Edwin, Selleck Memorial, 1916, pp. 18, 21.
Snowden, Yates, History of South Carolina, Chicago and New York, 1920, 2:628.
Warren, Mary B., Marriages and Deaths 1763 to 1820 Abstracted from extant Georgia Newspapers, 1968, p. 44

Death

Selleck Memorial with Collateral Connections
Author: William Edwin Selleck
Published: Chicago, Illinois: Privately Printed, 1916.
p. 13.

Emigration

Selleck and Peck Genealogy
Author: William Edwin Selleck
Published: Chicago, Illinois: Privately Printed, Jul 1912.
pp. 1, 11, 13.
The Sellecks and collaterals had much to do with the ruling power during Colonial times in Fairfield County, Connecticut, and the Public Records of the Colony will show many items of interest not herein contained.

The records of the Selleck family seem to show that David was the ancestor of nearly all of that name in the United States.

Emigrants who came to this country previous to 1643 were entitled to be classed as first settlers, at that date there being about 21,200 souls, or thereabouts (Caleb H. Snow's History of Boston, page 2). Taking the Selleck and Peck records, the writer shows nine direct ancestors who were first settlers; viz.: David Selleck and Susannah, his wife, 1633; Rich Law and Margaret, his wife, 1635; William Peck and Elizabeth, his wife, and Rev. Jeremiah, his son, 1637; and Captain James Sands and Thomas Kilborne in 1635.
...
p. 13

According to James H. Stark, Vice-President of the Dorchester Historical Society, the first emigration from England to Dorchester sailed from the Isle of Wight on April 8, 1630, on the ship Mary and John.

What was known as the Second Emigration sailed from Weymouth, England, and arrived in Dorchester in July, 1633.

In the History of Dorchester, page 100, will be found a complete list of the passengers - eighty-five in all - comprising the Second Emigration, with David Selleck as one of the number.

In John Winthrop's (First Governor of Massachusetts) Journal, page 51, he mentions the arrival of this ship July 24, 1633, and states a ship arrived from Weymouth with about eighty passengers and twelve kine, which set down at Dorchester. They were twelve weeks coming, being forced into the western islands by a leak, where they stayed three weeks, and were very courteously used by the Portuguese, but the extremity of the heat there and the continued rain brought sickness upon them. Above twenty died of pestilent fever.

There is a question whether David Selleck arrived in Dorchester in 1633 or 1635. The list mentioned above is only claimed as regarded as a near approach to a correct list of the Second Emigration.

Richard Mather unquestionably came in 1635, and his name appears in the 1633 list. His almost daily diary of his trip across on the ship James mentions names of fellow-passengers in 1635 that appear in the 1633 list, showing conclusively that the 1633 list is only partially correct. But as long as David Selleck's name appears in the 1633 list of the Second Emigration, and is the only record found of his arrival, it seems proper to state that he arrived at that date.

Religion

Selleck and Peck Genealogy
Author: William Edwin Selleck
Published: Chicago, Illinois: Privately Printed, Jul 1912.
p.11.

Residence

Selleck and Peck Genealogy
Author: William Edwin Selleck
Published: Chicago, Illinois: Privately Printed, Jul 1912.
pp.11,14-15.
On page 792 of Samuel G. Drake's American History and Antiquities of Boston from its settlement in 1630 to the year 1770 will be found a description of David Selleck's Home Lot, a verbatim copy of which is herewith given.

Sellick David ? House and garden Jas. Oliver E. Val. Hill N. Mr. Pierce W. the St. S ? House purch'd of Christ. Lawson, formerly Henry Symonds and a garden the St. W'd, the common marsh tor'd the N. E., John Hill and Nthl. Long tor'ds the S. together with a lane of 10 ft. leading to s'd garden, also the wharf or lane lying about s'd. house 42 ft. wide and 56 ft. long by grant of Gen. Court. This by deed 20 (11) 1645 ackn. before Mr. Hibbens same day Edw'd. Wells gr. David S. his house and garden Samson Shore N. E. the Cove S. E., John Milom S. W. John Hills garden N. W. by deed n (7) 1647

Ackn'g before Winthrop Gov'r 14 (7) 1647

This Home Lot, was as near as can be determined, about where no State Street is now. In those days this was called King street. While it had no record then, it is not uninteresting to know that it was located within a stone's throw of the Old State House, built in 1713, the site of the Boston Massacre? Here was shed the first blood of the American Revolution ?and Faneuil Hall, The Cradle of Liberty.

Freeman

Selleck and Peck Genealogy
Author: William Edwin Selleck
Published: Chicago, Illinois: Privately Printed, Jul 1912.
p.11.

Religion

Selleck and Peck Genealogy
Author: William Edwin Selleck
Published: Chicago, Illinois: Privately Printed, Jul 1912.
p.11.

Occupation

Selleck and Peck Genealogy
Author: William Edwin Selleck
Published: Chicago, Illinois: Privately Printed, Jul 1912.
pp.11,12.
His business was soap boiler. He probably came from Bristol, England. The manufacture of soap in Bristol was a very important business. In 1851 Book of New England Historical and Genealogical Register, page 400, will be found where Christopher Gibson sope boyler moved to Boston, probably in 1646, as in that year he bought of David Selleck half of all belonging to his trade.
...

The first impression at the present time of a soap boiler would hardly inspire one very much, but it was a calling of high class, and required what was then considered quite a large capital, and more than ordinary business ability to conduct it.

Occupation

Selleck and Peck Genealogy
Author: William Edwin Selleck
Published: Chicago, Illinois: Privately Printed, Jul 1912.
p.12.
While his business was connected with soap, it is generally known in Boston and Dorchester that he gave more attention to other matters than boiling soap. Was interested more or less in coast trading. Was either part of sole owner of a vessel that was used in coast trading, and, in fact, was an all-around speculator, ready for any kind of trade. Was quite a prominent man, quite a leader, and far above the general run of early settlers.

Marriage

\i Bulletin of the Stamford Genealogical Society\i0, newsletter
[vol 19, Sep 1976, pp.31-33]

Reprinted from THE MAYFLOWER QUARTERLY
February 1976

Pilgrim Ancestors ...
Brown-Groover, Pilgrim Ancestors of Revolutionary Soldiers, Volume 19 (September 1976): p. 33.

Full Source Text

\i Bulletin of the Stamford Genealogical Society\i0, newsletter
[vol 19, Sep 1976, pp.31-33]

Reprinted from THE MAYFLOWER QUARTERLY
February 1976

Pilgrim Ancestors of Revolutionary Soldiers
No. 6 - The Selleck Family of CT, NY, GA and SC
By Mary-Agnes Brown-Groover
A.B., LL. B. S.J.D.

[Note at bottom of page: Mrs. Groover is a descendant of Isaac Allerton and a member of the D.C. Mayflower Society. Her husband, the late Gordon L. Groover, M.D., was a descendant of Aurelia Selleck. The author has been a member of the bar of D.C. and the Supreme Court, and is a Lt. Col., Army Reserver, retired. She served in the Pacific in charge of the WAC during WWII and received the Legion of Merit.]

FREDERICK[6] SELLECK was born in 1755 to Gershom and Puella (Gorham) Selleck of Stamford, Fairfield County, CT. Puella, sometimes called Priscilla, was a fifth generation descendant of John Howland and Elizabeth Tilley of the Mayflower. In 1757 Gershom moved his family to Salem NY where, presumably, their daughter Charlotte was born in 1763. In 1777 the Sellecks were living in South Salem NY, in Westchester County, just over the line from Ridgefield CT. This county suffered severely during the Revolution. The whole southern part was marked by the marches, works of defense, or skermishes and battles of the armies. In 1784, Charlotte married Stephen Fitch who died in 1848, son of Bushnell Fitch.

Frederick Selleck and his father Gershom received pay for service in the Revolutionary War as enlisted men in Crane's Regiment of the New York Militia for Westchester County, which is located on Long Island Sound. On 12 July, 1785, Frederick acknowledged receipt from Thadeus Crane of [pounds]5 11s. 6d. as settlement in full for his services. Military records also show two levy certificates delivered to Fradrick Sillick on 26 Aug. 1785, one for [pounds]18 4s. 4d. on orders of Gershon Sillick, the other for [pounds]7 17s. 10d. on orders of Abraham Hanford. The ranks which father and son held and their specific military services are not known. The U.S. Adjutant General has stated that Frederick and Gershom Selleck are the only soldiers of those names found to have served in the Revolution.

After the war, Gershom returned to Fairfield County CT where he was recorded as a family head in the first U.S. Census, 1790. About this time, Frederick married Esther Hanford, daughter of Theophilus and Keziah Hanford. Esther was born in New Canaan CT, 27 Mar. 1760 and was a descendant of Thomas Hanford. Frederick and Esther had a son Frederick William[7] born 26 June 1791, and a daughter Aurelia born about 1797.

On 30 Sept. 1791 Frederick Sillick was appointed a lieutenant of the state militia group in newly formed Herkimer County, in the middle of New York state, and on 25 Sept. 1793 he was appointed a captain-lieutenant of a troop of horse for the company. His name also comes up in the militia records on 25 Mar. 1797.

Census records show Frederick and his family residing in Rome NY in 1800. The 1810 census does not show the Sellecks probably because both he and Esther died prior to that date. The town of Rome occupied the site of Fort Stanwix which was built in 1758 and repaired in 1777 to protect the valuable Mohawk Valley in eastern NY from the British.

In 1815, orphans Frederick[7] Selleck, aged 24, and Aurelia aged 19, were living with relatives in Savannah. Both married and left descendants in Georgia. Aurelia married Dr. John Bryant Greene of Screven Co. GA 13 April 1815 and had nine children.

A son of Frederick[7] served in the Mexican War - on 13 Sept. 1847, Lt. Frederick W. Selleck of the famed Palmetto Regiment, raised the first American flag over the City of Mexico, sustaining serious wounds as he did so. A monument was erected in his honor by his Captain, Foster Marshall, in Abbeville SC, and his portrait was hung in the State House in Columbia.

p. 33
David Selleck (1654-)
John Selleck (1643 - )
Nathaniel Selleck (1678-1712) Susanna Kibby ()
David Selleck (1700 -) Sarah Law (1639 - )
Gersham Selleck (1730-c1790) Sarah Lockwood (1678 - )
Mercy Waterbury ()

Frederick Selleck ( - c1800)

Puella Gorham (1730 - c1790) married Gersham Selleck 1750.

[The rest of the tree I already know. SSJ 02/21/2011]

References
Adjutant General, War Dept., letter of 20 July 1942 filed at NSDR Lib. DC under Selleck Family - CT and NY.
Barber and Howe, Historical Collections of the State of New York, 1841, pp. 366-370, 584.
Bolton, History of the County of Westchester, p. 281.
Golding, A.C., Descendants of Rev. Thomas Hanford, 1936, p. 20.
Hastings, Military Minutes of the Council of Appointments for the State of NY 1783-1821, Albany, 1901, pp. 206, 242, 392.
Huntington, Stamford Births, Marriages and Deaths, p. 38.
Ibid, History of Stamford, p. 184.
NSDAR Archives, DC, Gersham and Frederick Selleck Data submitted June 1942 by V.M.N. Black, DAR No. 254, 278.
Roberts, New York in the Revolution as Colony and State, 2nd ed., Albany 1898, p. 216.
Selleck, Rev. C.M., Norwalk, p. 200
Selleck, Wm. Edwin, Selleck Memorial, 1916, pp. 18, 21.
Snowden, Yates, History of South Carolina, Chicago and New York, 1920, 2:628.
Warren, Mary B., Marriages and Deaths 1763 to 1820 Abstracted from extant Georgia Newspapers, 1968, p. 44