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George Mosse

Sources

Birth

Norton & Mosse Family Record
, written by Martha Norton Buckner, Robert Godfrey Norton's daughter. It was later edited by Elizabeth Munsell (Norton), who married Robert Godfrey Norton's great-grandson, Walter Abell Norton, in 1906.

Birth

Transactions of the Huguenot Society of South Carolina, Issues 83-86. 1978.
65

Birth

Lineage book - National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution, volume 61-62
p. 278

MRS. FRANCES CONE NORTON GROOVER. 61803
Born in Effingham County, Ga.
Wife of Gordon L. Groover
Descendant of Lieut. William Norton, Dr. George Mosse, William Edwards, Capt. William Cone, Robert Marlow, and Capt. John Pitts.


p. 279

Daughter of Robert Godfrey ...
278-279

Full Source Text

Lineage book - National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution, volume 61-62
p. 278

MRS. FRANCES CONE NORTON GROOVER. 61803
Born in Effingham County, Ga.
Wife of Gordon L. Groover
Descendant of Lieut. William Norton, Dr. George Mosse, William Edwards, Capt. William Cone, Robert Marlow, and Capt. John Pitts.


p. 279

Daughter of Robert Godfrey Norton, M. D. (1841-1900), and Martha Edwards (b. 1842), his wife, m. 1861.

Granddaughter of Alexander R. Norton, M. D., and Julia Greene, his wife; Joseph Chapman Edwards (1808-92) and Frances Cone (1808-92), his wife, m. 1833.

Gr-granddaughter of Robert Godfrey Norton (d. 1868) and Sarah Mosse (1790-1867), his wife (cousins); Obadiah Edwards (1777-1857) and Tabitha Pitts (1782-1863), his wife; Aaron Cone and Susannah marlow (1770-1818), his wife.

Gr-gr-granddaughter of William Norton and Mary Godfrey, his wife; George Mosse, M. D., and Dorothy Phoebe Norton, his 2nd wife; William Edwards and Chloe Stokes, his wife; John Pitts and Frances Griffin, his wife; William Cone and Keziah Barber, his wife; Robert Marlow and Ann ---- (1750-1829), his wife.

William Norton (1744-1800) served as lieutenant in the South Carolina Continental troops. he was born in England; died in Bluffton, S. C.

George Mosse (1742-1808), a graduate of Dublin, served in the militia and was taken prisoner at the fall of Charleston. He was born in Ireland; died in Beaufort District, S. C.

William Edwards enlisted, 1775, as a private in Capt. J. Elliot's company, Col. Charles C. Pinckney's regiment; 1779, in Capt. William Caldwell's company, 3rd South Carolina regiment, and served until 1781. He died, 1833, in Effingham County, Ga.

William Cone served as private in McLean's regiment, Georgia State troops. He was born in North Carolina; died in Bullock County, Ga.

Robert Marlow (1740-1802) served, 1781, as a private in the South Carolina militia. He was born in South Carolina; died in Screven County, Ga.

John Pitts (1740-87) commanded a company, 1780, in Col. Samuel Jarvis' 1st North Carolina regiment. he died in Effingham County, Ga.

Also No. 56186

Death

South Carolina Baptists, 1670-1805. Google Books. Digital images. (1935)
Author: Leah Townsend Ph.D.
Published: http://books.google.com/books?id=x_oKCnKKwyoC&printsec=frontcover&dq=%22south+carolina+baptists,+1670-1805%22&hl=en&ei=IlGpS96JO46-sgPV-eGKAQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CDMQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=&f=false: 2003
43.
Robert W. Gibbes, Documentary History of the American Revolution, 1781-1782 (Columbia, 1853), p. 76: List of prisoners on board schooner Pack Horse, May 18, 1781, included George Mosse; he died on Feb. 17, 1808, leaving a widow and seven daughters; a eulogy appeared in the Charleston Times, Apr. 4, 1808, quoted in A. S. Salley, Jr., Historical Notes, in SCHGM, VII (1006), 99; Charleston Courier, Apr. 5, 1808.

Death

Lineage book - National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution, volume 61-62
p. 278

MRS. FRANCES CONE NORTON GROOVER. 61803
Born in Effingham County, Ga.
Wife of Gordon L. Groover
Descendant of Lieut. William Norton, Dr. George Mosse, William Edwards, Capt. William Cone, Robert Marlow, and Capt. John Pitts.


p. 279

Daughter of Robert Godfrey ...
279

Full Source Text

Lineage book - National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution, volume 61-62
p. 278

MRS. FRANCES CONE NORTON GROOVER. 61803
Born in Effingham County, Ga.
Wife of Gordon L. Groover
Descendant of Lieut. William Norton, Dr. George Mosse, William Edwards, Capt. William Cone, Robert Marlow, and Capt. John Pitts.


p. 279

Daughter of Robert Godfrey Norton, M. D. (1841-1900), and Martha Edwards (b. 1842), his wife, m. 1861.

Granddaughter of Alexander R. Norton, M. D., and Julia Greene, his wife; Joseph Chapman Edwards (1808-92) and Frances Cone (1808-92), his wife, m. 1833.

Gr-granddaughter of Robert Godfrey Norton (d. 1868) and Sarah Mosse (1790-1867), his wife (cousins); Obadiah Edwards (1777-1857) and Tabitha Pitts (1782-1863), his wife; Aaron Cone and Susannah marlow (1770-1818), his wife.

Gr-gr-granddaughter of William Norton and Mary Godfrey, his wife; George Mosse, M. D., and Dorothy Phoebe Norton, his 2nd wife; William Edwards and Chloe Stokes, his wife; John Pitts and Frances Griffin, his wife; William Cone and Keziah Barber, his wife; Robert Marlow and Ann ---- (1750-1829), his wife.

William Norton (1744-1800) served as lieutenant in the South Carolina Continental troops. he was born in England; died in Bluffton, S. C.

George Mosse (1742-1808), a graduate of Dublin, served in the militia and was taken prisoner at the fall of Charleston. He was born in Ireland; died in Beaufort District, S. C.

William Edwards enlisted, 1775, as a private in Capt. J. Elliot's company, Col. Charles C. Pinckney's regiment; 1779, in Capt. William Caldwell's company, 3rd South Carolina regiment, and served until 1781. He died, 1833, in Effingham County, Ga.

William Cone served as private in McLean's regiment, Georgia State troops. He was born in North Carolina; died in Bullock County, Ga.

Robert Marlow (1740-1802) served, 1781, as a private in the South Carolina militia. He was born in South Carolina; died in Screven County, Ga.

John Pitts (1740-87) commanded a company, 1780, in Col. Samuel Jarvis' 1st North Carolina regiment. he died in Effingham County, Ga.

Also No. 56186

Death

Names in South Carolina
Author: Claude Henry Netiffer, editor
Published: 1972-1977; reprint, Spartanburg, South Carolina: The Reprint Company, Publishers, 1983.
p. 36 ...
On 16 Aug. 1698 John Bayley of Ballingclough, County Tipperary, Ireland, Landgrave and Caccique of Carolina, was granted by the Lords Proprietors Bayley's Barony (12,000 acres) which included most of Hilton Head Island other than land fronting on Port Royal Sound and on Skull Creek. Neither he, nor any of hi ...
XIX: 45.
In 1807 he bought a plantation at Robertville where several of his daughters lived and there both he and his wife died and were buried in 1808.

Full Source Text

Names in South Carolina
Author: Claude Henry Netiffer, editor
Published: 1972-1977; reprint, Spartanburg, South Carolina: The Reprint Company, Publishers, 1983.
p. 36 ...
On 16 Aug. 1698 John Bayley of Ballingclough, County Tipperary, Ireland, Landgrave and Caccique of Carolina, was granted by the Lords Proprietors Bayley's Barony (12,000 acres) which included most of Hilton Head Island other than land fronting on Port Royal Sound and on Skull Creek. Neither he, nor any of his family, ever visited Hilton Head Island. His son and heir, John Bayley, early in the eighteenth century appointed Alexander Trench as his agent for selling the property. Trench did make several sales of plantations, notably to Captain John Gascoigne and to Roger Moore. But the bulk of the Barony remained in the Bayley family until after the Revolutionary War. In 1783 Dr. George Mosse surveyed the Bayley holdings which then consisted of 47 tracts totalling 14,924 acres.

p. 45 ...

Dr. George Mosse (1742-1808) arrived in Carolina
by 1767, in 1771 marrying Dorothy Phoebe, daughter
of Jonathan Norton, Vestryman of St. Helena's Parish.
He practiced medicine, operated an extensive tannery
and leather business, planted grapes from which he
made sugar and wines, cane from which he made
sugar and rum, indigo and benne (or sesame, prized
for the valuable oil pressed from its seed). He served
as surgeon at the Battle of Camden, was captured
and imprisoned by the British aboard the Prison
Ships Torbay and Pack Horse in Charleston harbor.
After the War he surveyed what remained of Bayley's
Barony for further development by Benjamin Bayley
as agent for Henry Bayley, dividing its 14,924 acres
into 47 land lots or plantations. Shortly after 1790 he
moved his wife and seven daughters to a spacious
home on the southeast corner of Broughton and West
Broad Streets in Savannah where he conducted a
school for young ladies for several years. He was a
founding deacon of Savannah's First Baptist Church
in 1795. In 1807 he bought a plantation at Robertville
where several of his daughters lived and there both
he and his wife died and were buried in 1808. An
oil portrait of him is extant.

Burial

Norton & Mosse Family Record
, written by Martha Norton Buckner, Robert Godfrey Norton's daughter. It was later edited by Elizabeth Munsell (Norton), who married Robert Godfrey Norton's great-grandson, Walter Abell Norton, in 1906.

Burial

Names in South Carolina
Author: Claude Henry Netiffer, editor
Published: 1972-1977; reprint, Spartanburg, South Carolina: The Reprint Company, Publishers, 1983.
p. 36 ...
On 16 Aug. 1698 John Bayley of Ballingclough, County Tipperary, Ireland, Landgrave and Caccique of Carolina, was granted by the Lords Proprietors Bayley's Barony (12,000 acres) which included most of Hilton Head Island other than land fronting on Port Royal Sound and on Skull Creek. Neither he, nor any of hi ...
XIX: 45.
In 1807 he bought a plantation at Robertville where several of his daughters lived and there both he and his wife died and were buried in 1808.

Full Source Text

Names in South Carolina
Author: Claude Henry Netiffer, editor
Published: 1972-1977; reprint, Spartanburg, South Carolina: The Reprint Company, Publishers, 1983.
p. 36 ...
On 16 Aug. 1698 John Bayley of Ballingclough, County Tipperary, Ireland, Landgrave and Caccique of Carolina, was granted by the Lords Proprietors Bayley's Barony (12,000 acres) which included most of Hilton Head Island other than land fronting on Port Royal Sound and on Skull Creek. Neither he, nor any of his family, ever visited Hilton Head Island. His son and heir, John Bayley, early in the eighteenth century appointed Alexander Trench as his agent for selling the property. Trench did make several sales of plantations, notably to Captain John Gascoigne and to Roger Moore. But the bulk of the Barony remained in the Bayley family until after the Revolutionary War. In 1783 Dr. George Mosse surveyed the Bayley holdings which then consisted of 47 tracts totalling 14,924 acres.

p. 45 ...

Dr. George Mosse (1742-1808) arrived in Carolina
by 1767, in 1771 marrying Dorothy Phoebe, daughter
of Jonathan Norton, Vestryman of St. Helena's Parish.
He practiced medicine, operated an extensive tannery
and leather business, planted grapes from which he
made sugar and wines, cane from which he made
sugar and rum, indigo and benne (or sesame, prized
for the valuable oil pressed from its seed). He served
as surgeon at the Battle of Camden, was captured
and imprisoned by the British aboard the Prison
Ships Torbay and Pack Horse in Charleston harbor.
After the War he surveyed what remained of Bayley's
Barony for further development by Benjamin Bayley
as agent for Henry Bayley, dividing its 14,924 acres
into 47 land lots or plantations. Shortly after 1790 he
moved his wife and seven daughters to a spacious
home on the southeast corner of Broughton and West
Broad Streets in Savannah where he conducted a
school for young ladies for several years. He was a
founding deacon of Savannah's First Baptist Church
in 1795. In 1807 he bought a plantation at Robertville
where several of his daughters lived and there both
he and his wife died and were buried in 1808. An
oil portrait of him is extant.

Burial

Kith and kin: a portrait of a southern family (1630-1934)
Author: Carolyn Lawton Harrell
Published: N.p.: Mercer University Press, 1984.
p. 164
...

George Mosse, a native of Ireland, and educated there as a physician, settled on St. Helena's Island, South Carolina, when he came to America. Although he was a practicing physician, he supported his family largely through the operation of a store and a large tannery on St. Helena's. Many journeymen and apprentices ma ...
164-165.

Full Source Text

Kith and kin: a portrait of a southern family (1630-1934)
Author: Carolyn Lawton Harrell
Published: N.p.: Mercer University Press, 1984.
p. 164
...

George Mosse, a native of Ireland, and educated there as a physician, settled on St. Helena's Island, South Carolina, when he came to America. Although he was a practicing physician, he supported his family largely through the operation of a store and a large tannery on St. Helena's. Many journeymen and apprentices maintained the tanning vats by the riverside. Each month the doctor's slaves rowed him in his twelve-oared boat to Savannah or Charleston where he purchased supplies for his businesses. The tannery, if not his medical profession, proved profitable. Mosse served in the Contenental Army during the revolutionary war. Taken prisoner after the Battle of Camden, he was held in May 1781 on board the British prison ship Torbay in Charleston's harbor. One night, his shackles loosened to permit him to go on deck from the stifflingly hot shiphold, he evaded his captors and slipped quietly, unnoticed, into the waters. Knowing the harbor well, he swam to safety at nearby Hilton Head Island. Mosse resumed his post as surgeon in the Continental Army, and after the war returned to his home and businesses on St. Helena's Island.

Mosse employed a teacher for his seven daughters and sent the eldest ones to finishing school in Charleston. He purchased lands in the Black Swamp area of St. Peter's Parish and in fine weather he took his wife and daughters for long vacations there. One of the girl's aunts, Hettie McKenzie, kept a boarding school on Bay Street in Savannah. At the turn of the eighteenth century, as his youngest daughters grew older, Dr. Mosse sold his St. Helena property and moved his family to Savannah, where the girls

p. 165

could attend school at Aunt Hettie's. He practiced medicine more vigorously in Savannah; helped form (October 26, 1880) [should probably read 1780 - SSJ 03/24/2010] and became one of the first deacons of the Baptist church there; organized the old Savannah Medical College; became a charter member of the first Medical Society in Georgia; and served as superintendent of elections for mayor and aldermen. All the while, George Mosse kept up contacts with his plantation at Black Swamp and with his friends there, among whom the large family of Joseph Lawton was included. As could be expected, during the summer months when the Mosse Family lived in St. Peters Parish, the ebullient, lively Lawton boys, as they reached maturity, were inevitably drawn to the houseful of seven nubile girls on the next plantation. With both sets of parents friends of long standing, and their children playmates through the years, they grew up in an aura of mutual friendship. The parents gave their blessings as first one and then another and then another of the Lawton sons courted and married a Mosse daughter.(30)

----

(Footnote 30:)
The narrative of George Mosse and his family are based on the following sources: The Times, April 4, 1808; Norton and Mosse Family Record, as written in 1891 by Mrs. Walter A. Norton - a paper presented to the Georgia Historical Society, November 21, 1963. Typewritten copies of these documents are in the author's possession. Additional sources were: the Courier, April 5, 1808; Erwin, South Carolinians in the Revolution, 85-86; DAC Lineage Book, Lineage of Mrs. Laura Erwin Lawton Reynolds.

Residence

Hilton Head; a sea island chronicle
Author: Virginia C. Holmgren
Published: Hilton Head Island, S.C.: Hilton Head Island Publishing Company, 1959.
64.
A few other names must be added before the roster of the eighteenth century is completed. Two families, the Currels (Curls) and the Fylers, were neighbors of the Talbirds along Skull Creek, and the name Currel's Sink is still given to a swampy curve of the shoreline. Neighbors of the Davants on the south end were the families of Sara Waight, Thomas Ferguson, and Dr. George Mosse. Elizabeth Mosse married her neighbor James Stoney at St. Helena's church on February 27, 1793. Their daughter Martha married Thomas Henry Barksdale, son of neighbors George and his second wife, Ann Agnes Bona. Thomas Henry was both born and buried on Hilton Head, and he left his estate to his wife, who also inherited land from her father. The land passed in turn to her second husband, Joseph Lawton, and to their son Samuel. In time the plantation became referred to simply as Laawton's.

Occupation

A Standard History of Georgia and Georgians
Author: Lucian Lamar Knight
Published: Chicago, Illinois: The Lewis Publishing Company, 1917.


GEORGE MOSSE NORTON, M.D. One of the be ...
Vol. V: p. 2314.

Full Source Text

A Standard History of Georgia and Georgians
Author: Lucian Lamar Knight
Published: Chicago, Illinois: The Lewis Publishing Company, 1917.


GEORGE MOSSE NORTON, M.D. One of the best known men in the medical profession of Savannah is Dr. George Mosse Norton, a member of one of the oldest southern families, who is capably maintaining the family reputation for professional skill, public-spirited citizenship and prominence in social life. While one of the younger members of his honored calling, has already attained a degree of prominence that might well be envied by men many years his senior. Doctor Norton was born at Savannah, November 29, 1873, and is a son of Dr. Robert Godfrey and Martha Jane (Edwards) Norton.

The old and distinguished family of Norton was founded in the United States by Jonathan Norton, a native of England, who emigrated to this country at an early day and settled on the Island of Saint Helena, on the south coast of South Carolina, where he died in 1774, aged sixty-nine years. He married Mary Ann Chaplin, and one of their daughters, Dorothy Phoebe became the wife of Dr. George Mosse, who became a notable character in the coast country of South Carolina and later at Savannah. He was born and reared at Dublin, Ireland, and there educated for the medical profession, and after his graduation from one of the leading medical institutions of that city, emigrated to America and settled on the Island of Saint Helena. There he subsequently became the owner of a large amount of landed property, was a prominent planter, and a leading manufacturer of leather. He carried on an extensive medical practice at the same time and was one of the most influential men of his locality. Both the Nortons and the Mosses had been originally members of the Protestant Episcopal Church, but after coming to America joined the Baptist faith. Dr. George Mosse, at his own expense, built a house of worship at Saint Helena. Finding the opportunities for an educational training very limited there, in 1799 or 1800, in order to give his children better facilities, he removed with his family to Savannah. Here one of his daughters, Martha, became the wife of Co1. Alexander Lawton, and they were the parents of Gen. A. R. Lawton, who was one of the most distinguished lawyers of Savannah, a brigadier-general in the Confederate army, and for a long time general attorney for the Central of Georgia Railway.

Members of the Norton family have resided on the Island of Saint Helena for more than a century and have been closely identified with its history as well as with that of the nearby South Carolina towns of Beaufort, Bluffton, Robertsville and Black Swamp. The great-grandfather of Dr. George M. Norton was the son of the pioneer Nathan Norton. William Norton married Mary Godfrey and later moved to Savannah. One of their sons was Robert Godfrey Norton, a soldier of the Continental line during the Revolutionary war. Robert Godfrey Norton married his cousin, Sarah Mosse, and passed the greater part of his life at Robertsville, South Carolina. One of his sons was Dr. Robert Alexander Norton, a grandfather of Dr. George M. Norton, who for a number of years practiced medicine at Savannah and was the city's first port physician. He married Miss Julia Green, and after living for a number of years at Robertsville South Carolina, moved, at the close of the Civil war, to Savannah, and here died in 1869.

Dr. Robert Godfrey Norton, father of Dr. George M. Norton, was born at Robertsville, South Carolina, March 17, 1841, and died at Savannah in 1900. He was a graduate of the Charleston Medical College and was one of the leading practitioners of medicine at Savannah for many years. In 1861 he was marred to Martha Jane Edwards, of Effingham County, Georgia, and they became the parents of the following children: Fannie Cone, who is now the wife of Gordon L. Groover, of Savannah; Robert G.; William Edwards; Dr. George Mosse; and Dr. Walter Abell, who is engaged in the practice of medicine at Savannah. Dr. William Edwards Norton, another of the family to follow the healing art, died in March, 1911, at Savannah.

Dr. George Mosse Norton received his early education in the public schools of Savannah, following which he entered the University of Georgia, at Athens. He also studied medicine at the Southern Medical College, Atlanta, from which he was graduated in 1898, and to further prepare himself went to New York and took a course of study in the New York Post Graduate Medical School. Returning to Savannah, he entered practice and shortly became recognized as one of the city's most thorough and talented practitioners. For some time he carried on a general practice, but of recent years has turned his attention more and more to major surgery, a field in which he has few rivals at this time. He is a member of the Georgia State Medical Society and the American Medical Association, and a member of the staff of the Park View Sanatorium. Fraternally the doctor is affiliated with the Masons and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, while he has maintained the family's military record as a member of the Georgia Hussars, in which he is surgeon, with the rank of lieutenant, and from which organization he received a medal for superior horsemanship in 1899.

Savannah is a city noted for its historic old mansions, and the home of Doctor Norton is an example of that substantial style of architecture which prevailed in the days when timber was plentiful and veneer a thing unknown. This residence was built by Joseph Waldburg, and after his death was occupied by his son-in-law, Colonel Clinch. The walls are two feet thick; the bricks all rosined, as are the hard-wood floors; the ceiling walls and partitions, and the inside woodwork, are all of the costliest material. A delightful garden on the Barnard Street side of the house is in keeping with the rest of the property and on the west side is another garden which offers an enticing playground for the children.

Doctor Norton was married October 6, 1902, at Savannah, to Miss Leila Exley, daughter of Marquis L. and Emma N. (Groveston) Exley, an old, prominent and distinguished family of this city. Four children have been born to this union: Elizabeth Emma, Leila Lucille and Angela Willie, who are all attending school; and George Mosse, Jr.

Occupation

A Standard History of Georgia and Georgians
Author: Lucian Lamar Knight
Published: Chicago, Illinois: The Lewis Publishing Company, 1917.


GEORGE MOSSE NORTON, M.D. One of the be ...
V: 2314.

Full Source Text

A Standard History of Georgia and Georgians
Author: Lucian Lamar Knight
Published: Chicago, Illinois: The Lewis Publishing Company, 1917.


GEORGE MOSSE NORTON, M.D. One of the best known men in the medical profession of Savannah is Dr. George Mosse Norton, a member of one of the oldest southern families, who is capably maintaining the family reputation for professional skill, public-spirited citizenship and prominence in social life. While one of the younger members of his honored calling, has already attained a degree of prominence that might well be envied by men many years his senior. Doctor Norton was born at Savannah, November 29, 1873, and is a son of Dr. Robert Godfrey and Martha Jane (Edwards) Norton.

The old and distinguished family of Norton was founded in the United States by Jonathan Norton, a native of England, who emigrated to this country at an early day and settled on the Island of Saint Helena, on the south coast of South Carolina, where he died in 1774, aged sixty-nine years. He married Mary Ann Chaplin, and one of their daughters, Dorothy Phoebe became the wife of Dr. George Mosse, who became a notable character in the coast country of South Carolina and later at Savannah. He was born and reared at Dublin, Ireland, and there educated for the medical profession, and after his graduation from one of the leading medical institutions of that city, emigrated to America and settled on the Island of Saint Helena. There he subsequently became the owner of a large amount of landed property, was a prominent planter, and a leading manufacturer of leather. He carried on an extensive medical practice at the same time and was one of the most influential men of his locality. Both the Nortons and the Mosses had been originally members of the Protestant Episcopal Church, but after coming to America joined the Baptist faith. Dr. George Mosse, at his own expense, built a house of worship at Saint Helena. Finding the opportunities for an educational training very limited there, in 1799 or 1800, in order to give his children better facilities, he removed with his family to Savannah. Here one of his daughters, Martha, became the wife of Co1. Alexander Lawton, and they were the parents of Gen. A. R. Lawton, who was one of the most distinguished lawyers of Savannah, a brigadier-general in the Confederate army, and for a long time general attorney for the Central of Georgia Railway.

Members of the Norton family have resided on the Island of Saint Helena for more than a century and have been closely identified with its history as well as with that of the nearby South Carolina towns of Beaufort, Bluffton, Robertsville and Black Swamp. The great-grandfather of Dr. George M. Norton was the son of the pioneer Nathan Norton. William Norton married Mary Godfrey and later moved to Savannah. One of their sons was Robert Godfrey Norton, a soldier of the Continental line during the Revolutionary war. Robert Godfrey Norton married his cousin, Sarah Mosse, and passed the greater part of his life at Robertsville, South Carolina. One of his sons was Dr. Robert Alexander Norton, a grandfather of Dr. George M. Norton, who for a number of years practiced medicine at Savannah and was the city's first port physician. He married Miss Julia Green, and after living for a number of years at Robertsville South Carolina, moved, at the close of the Civil war, to Savannah, and here died in 1869.

Dr. Robert Godfrey Norton, father of Dr. George M. Norton, was born at Robertsville, South Carolina, March 17, 1841, and died at Savannah in 1900. He was a graduate of the Charleston Medical College and was one of the leading practitioners of medicine at Savannah for many years. In 1861 he was marred to Martha Jane Edwards, of Effingham County, Georgia, and they became the parents of the following children: Fannie Cone, who is now the wife of Gordon L. Groover, of Savannah; Robert G.; William Edwards; Dr. George Mosse; and Dr. Walter Abell, who is engaged in the practice of medicine at Savannah. Dr. William Edwards Norton, another of the family to follow the healing art, died in March, 1911, at Savannah.

Dr. George Mosse Norton received his early education in the public schools of Savannah, following which he entered the University of Georgia, at Athens. He also studied medicine at the Southern Medical College, Atlanta, from which he was graduated in 1898, and to further prepare himself went to New York and took a course of study in the New York Post Graduate Medical School. Returning to Savannah, he entered practice and shortly became recognized as one of the city's most thorough and talented practitioners. For some time he carried on a general practice, but of recent years has turned his attention more and more to major surgery, a field in which he has few rivals at this time. He is a member of the Georgia State Medical Society and the American Medical Association, and a member of the staff of the Park View Sanatorium. Fraternally the doctor is affiliated with the Masons and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, while he has maintained the family's military record as a member of the Georgia Hussars, in which he is surgeon, with the rank of lieutenant, and from which organization he received a medal for superior horsemanship in 1899.

Savannah is a city noted for its historic old mansions, and the home of Doctor Norton is an example of that substantial style of architecture which prevailed in the days when timber was plentiful and veneer a thing unknown. This residence was built by Joseph Waldburg, and after his death was occupied by his son-in-law, Colonel Clinch. The walls are two feet thick; the bricks all rosined, as are the hard-wood floors; the ceiling walls and partitions, and the inside woodwork, are all of the costliest material. A delightful garden on the Barnard Street side of the house is in keeping with the rest of the property and on the west side is another garden which offers an enticing playground for the children.

Doctor Norton was married October 6, 1902, at Savannah, to Miss Leila Exley, daughter of Marquis L. and Emma N. (Groveston) Exley, an old, prominent and distinguished family of this city. Four children have been born to this union: Elizabeth Emma, Leila Lucille and Angela Willie, who are all attending school; and George Mosse, Jr.

Occupation

Kith and kin: a portrait of a southern family (1630-1934)
Author: Carolyn Lawton Harrell
Published: N.p.: Mercer University Press, 1984.
p. 164
...

George Mosse, a native of Ireland, and educated there as a physician, settled on St. Helena's Island, South Carolina, when he came to America. Although he was a practicing physician, he supported his family largely through the operation of a store and a large tannery on St. Helena's. Many journeymen and apprentices ma ...
301.

Full Source Text

Kith and kin: a portrait of a southern family (1630-1934)
Author: Carolyn Lawton Harrell
Published: N.p.: Mercer University Press, 1984.
p. 164
...

George Mosse, a native of Ireland, and educated there as a physician, settled on St. Helena's Island, South Carolina, when he came to America. Although he was a practicing physician, he supported his family largely through the operation of a store and a large tannery on St. Helena's. Many journeymen and apprentices maintained the tanning vats by the riverside. Each month the doctor's slaves rowed him in his twelve-oared boat to Savannah or Charleston where he purchased supplies for his businesses. The tannery, if not his medical profession, proved profitable. Mosse served in the Contenental Army during the revolutionary war. Taken prisoner after the Battle of Camden, he was held in May 1781 on board the British prison ship Torbay in Charleston's harbor. One night, his shackles loosened to permit him to go on deck from the stifflingly hot shiphold, he evaded his captors and slipped quietly, unnoticed, into the waters. Knowing the harbor well, he swam to safety at nearby Hilton Head Island. Mosse resumed his post as surgeon in the Continental Army, and after the war returned to his home and businesses on St. Helena's Island.

Mosse employed a teacher for his seven daughters and sent the eldest ones to finishing school in Charleston. He purchased lands in the Black Swamp area of St. Peter's Parish and in fine weather he took his wife and daughters for long vacations there. One of the girl's aunts, Hettie McKenzie, kept a boarding school on Bay Street in Savannah. At the turn of the eighteenth century, as his youngest daughters grew older, Dr. Mosse sold his St. Helena property and moved his family to Savannah, where the girls

p. 165

could attend school at Aunt Hettie's. He practiced medicine more vigorously in Savannah; helped form (October 26, 1880) [should probably read 1780 - SSJ 03/24/2010] and became one of the first deacons of the Baptist church there; organized the old Savannah Medical College; became a charter member of the first Medical Society in Georgia; and served as superintendent of elections for mayor and aldermen. All the while, George Mosse kept up contacts with his plantation at Black Swamp and with his friends there, among whom the large family of Joseph Lawton was included. As could be expected, during the summer months when the Mosse Family lived in St. Peters Parish, the ebullient, lively Lawton boys, as they reached maturity, were inevitably drawn to the houseful of seven nubile girls on the next plantation. With both sets of parents friends of long standing, and their children playmates through the years, they grew up in an aura of mutual friendship. The parents gave their blessings as first one and then another and then another of the Lawton sons courted and married a Mosse daughter.(30)

----

(Footnote 30:)
The narrative of George Mosse and his family are based on the following sources: The Times, April 4, 1808; Norton and Mosse Family Record, as written in 1891 by Mrs. Walter A. Norton - a paper presented to the Georgia Historical Society, November 21, 1963. Typewritten copies of these documents are in the author's possession. Additional sources were: the Courier, April 5, 1808; Erwin, South Carolinians in the Revolution, 85-86; DAC Lineage Book, Lineage of Mrs. Laura Erwin Lawton Reynolds.

Occupation

A Standard History of Georgia and Georgians
Author: Lucian Lamar Knight
Published: Chicago, Illinois: The Lewis Publishing Company, 1917.


GEORGE MOSSE NORTON, M.D. One of the be ...
V: 2314.

Full Source Text

A Standard History of Georgia and Georgians
Author: Lucian Lamar Knight
Published: Chicago, Illinois: The Lewis Publishing Company, 1917.


GEORGE MOSSE NORTON, M.D. One of the best known men in the medical profession of Savannah is Dr. George Mosse Norton, a member of one of the oldest southern families, who is capably maintaining the family reputation for professional skill, public-spirited citizenship and prominence in social life. While one of the younger members of his honored calling, has already attained a degree of prominence that might well be envied by men many years his senior. Doctor Norton was born at Savannah, November 29, 1873, and is a son of Dr. Robert Godfrey and Martha Jane (Edwards) Norton.

The old and distinguished family of Norton was founded in the United States by Jonathan Norton, a native of England, who emigrated to this country at an early day and settled on the Island of Saint Helena, on the south coast of South Carolina, where he died in 1774, aged sixty-nine years. He married Mary Ann Chaplin, and one of their daughters, Dorothy Phoebe became the wife of Dr. George Mosse, who became a notable character in the coast country of South Carolina and later at Savannah. He was born and reared at Dublin, Ireland, and there educated for the medical profession, and after his graduation from one of the leading medical institutions of that city, emigrated to America and settled on the Island of Saint Helena. There he subsequently became the owner of a large amount of landed property, was a prominent planter, and a leading manufacturer of leather. He carried on an extensive medical practice at the same time and was one of the most influential men of his locality. Both the Nortons and the Mosses had been originally members of the Protestant Episcopal Church, but after coming to America joined the Baptist faith. Dr. George Mosse, at his own expense, built a house of worship at Saint Helena. Finding the opportunities for an educational training very limited there, in 1799 or 1800, in order to give his children better facilities, he removed with his family to Savannah. Here one of his daughters, Martha, became the wife of Co1. Alexander Lawton, and they were the parents of Gen. A. R. Lawton, who was one of the most distinguished lawyers of Savannah, a brigadier-general in the Confederate army, and for a long time general attorney for the Central of Georgia Railway.

Members of the Norton family have resided on the Island of Saint Helena for more than a century and have been closely identified with its history as well as with that of the nearby South Carolina towns of Beaufort, Bluffton, Robertsville and Black Swamp. The great-grandfather of Dr. George M. Norton was the son of the pioneer Nathan Norton. William Norton married Mary Godfrey and later moved to Savannah. One of their sons was Robert Godfrey Norton, a soldier of the Continental line during the Revolutionary war. Robert Godfrey Norton married his cousin, Sarah Mosse, and passed the greater part of his life at Robertsville, South Carolina. One of his sons was Dr. Robert Alexander Norton, a grandfather of Dr. George M. Norton, who for a number of years practiced medicine at Savannah and was the city's first port physician. He married Miss Julia Green, and after living for a number of years at Robertsville South Carolina, moved, at the close of the Civil war, to Savannah, and here died in 1869.

Dr. Robert Godfrey Norton, father of Dr. George M. Norton, was born at Robertsville, South Carolina, March 17, 1841, and died at Savannah in 1900. He was a graduate of the Charleston Medical College and was one of the leading practitioners of medicine at Savannah for many years. In 1861 he was marred to Martha Jane Edwards, of Effingham County, Georgia, and they became the parents of the following children: Fannie Cone, who is now the wife of Gordon L. Groover, of Savannah; Robert G.; William Edwards; Dr. George Mosse; and Dr. Walter Abell, who is engaged in the practice of medicine at Savannah. Dr. William Edwards Norton, another of the family to follow the healing art, died in March, 1911, at Savannah.

Dr. George Mosse Norton received his early education in the public schools of Savannah, following which he entered the University of Georgia, at Athens. He also studied medicine at the Southern Medical College, Atlanta, from which he was graduated in 1898, and to further prepare himself went to New York and took a course of study in the New York Post Graduate Medical School. Returning to Savannah, he entered practice and shortly became recognized as one of the city's most thorough and talented practitioners. For some time he carried on a general practice, but of recent years has turned his attention more and more to major surgery, a field in which he has few rivals at this time. He is a member of the Georgia State Medical Society and the American Medical Association, and a member of the staff of the Park View Sanatorium. Fraternally the doctor is affiliated with the Masons and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, while he has maintained the family's military record as a member of the Georgia Hussars, in which he is surgeon, with the rank of lieutenant, and from which organization he received a medal for superior horsemanship in 1899.

Savannah is a city noted for its historic old mansions, and the home of Doctor Norton is an example of that substantial style of architecture which prevailed in the days when timber was plentiful and veneer a thing unknown. This residence was built by Joseph Waldburg, and after his death was occupied by his son-in-law, Colonel Clinch. The walls are two feet thick; the bricks all rosined, as are the hard-wood floors; the ceiling walls and partitions, and the inside woodwork, are all of the costliest material. A delightful garden on the Barnard Street side of the house is in keeping with the rest of the property and on the west side is another garden which offers an enticing playground for the children.

Doctor Norton was married October 6, 1902, at Savannah, to Miss Leila Exley, daughter of Marquis L. and Emma N. (Groveston) Exley, an old, prominent and distinguished family of this city. Four children have been born to this union: Elizabeth Emma, Leila Lucille and Angela Willie, who are all attending school; and George Mosse, Jr.

Prisoner

Kith and kin: a portrait of a southern family (1630-1934)
Author: Carolyn Lawton Harrell
Published: N.p.: Mercer University Press, 1984.
p. 164
...

George Mosse, a native of Ireland, and educated there as a physician, settled on St. Helena's Island, South Carolina, when he came to America. Although he was a practicing physician, he supported his family largely through the operation of a store and a large tannery on St. Helena's. Many journeymen and apprentices ma ...
164.
Mosse served in the Contenental Army during the revolutionary war. Taken prisoner after the Battle of Camden, he was held in May 1781 on board the British prison ship Torbay in Charleston's harbor. One night, his shackles loosened to permit him to go on deck from the stifflingly hot shiphold, he evaded his captors and slipped quietly, unnoticed, into the waters. Knowing the harbor well, he swam to safety at nearby Hilton Head Island. Mosse resumed his post as surgeon in the Continental Army, and after the war returned to his home and businesses on St. Helena's Island.

Full Source Text

Kith and kin: a portrait of a southern family (1630-1934)
Author: Carolyn Lawton Harrell
Published: N.p.: Mercer University Press, 1984.
p. 164
...

George Mosse, a native of Ireland, and educated there as a physician, settled on St. Helena's Island, South Carolina, when he came to America. Although he was a practicing physician, he supported his family largely through the operation of a store and a large tannery on St. Helena's. Many journeymen and apprentices maintained the tanning vats by the riverside. Each month the doctor's slaves rowed him in his twelve-oared boat to Savannah or Charleston where he purchased supplies for his businesses. The tannery, if not his medical profession, proved profitable. Mosse served in the Contenental Army during the revolutionary war. Taken prisoner after the Battle of Camden, he was held in May 1781 on board the British prison ship Torbay in Charleston's harbor. One night, his shackles loosened to permit him to go on deck from the stifflingly hot shiphold, he evaded his captors and slipped quietly, unnoticed, into the waters. Knowing the harbor well, he swam to safety at nearby Hilton Head Island. Mosse resumed his post as surgeon in the Continental Army, and after the war returned to his home and businesses on St. Helena's Island.

Mosse employed a teacher for his seven daughters and sent the eldest ones to finishing school in Charleston. He purchased lands in the Black Swamp area of St. Peter's Parish and in fine weather he took his wife and daughters for long vacations there. One of the girl's aunts, Hettie McKenzie, kept a boarding school on Bay Street in Savannah. At the turn of the eighteenth century, as his youngest daughters grew older, Dr. Mosse sold his St. Helena property and moved his family to Savannah, where the girls

p. 165

could attend school at Aunt Hettie's. He practiced medicine more vigorously in Savannah; helped form (October 26, 1880) [should probably read 1780 - SSJ 03/24/2010] and became one of the first deacons of the Baptist church there; organized the old Savannah Medical College; became a charter member of the first Medical Society in Georgia; and served as superintendent of elections for mayor and aldermen. All the while, George Mosse kept up contacts with his plantation at Black Swamp and with his friends there, among whom the large family of Joseph Lawton was included. As could be expected, during the summer months when the Mosse Family lived in St. Peters Parish, the ebullient, lively Lawton boys, as they reached maturity, were inevitably drawn to the houseful of seven nubile girls on the next plantation. With both sets of parents friends of long standing, and their children playmates through the years, they grew up in an aura of mutual friendship. The parents gave their blessings as first one and then another and then another of the Lawton sons courted and married a Mosse daughter.(30)

----

(Footnote 30:)
The narrative of George Mosse and his family are based on the following sources: The Times, April 4, 1808; Norton and Mosse Family Record, as written in 1891 by Mrs. Walter A. Norton - a paper presented to the Georgia Historical Society, November 21, 1963. Typewritten copies of these documents are in the author's possession. Additional sources were: the Courier, April 5, 1808; Erwin, South Carolinians in the Revolution, 85-86; DAC Lineage Book, Lineage of Mrs. Laura Erwin Lawton Reynolds.

Prisoner

Roster of Revolutionary Soldiers in Georgia, Volume 1
Author: Howard H. McCall
Published: 1941; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004.
GIDEON MALLETTE, b. Purysburg, S.C., June 14, 1759; d. Effingham Co., Ga., Sept. 3, 1822. Served under Gen. Francis Marion, S.C. Troops. Mar. 1783, HANNA ELIZABETH A. DE ROCHE (1767-1848).

Children:
1. Gideon, Jr.
2. Mary Ann.
3. Abraham (1790-1867) ...
3: 172.
DR. GEORGE MOSSE, b. in England, 1741; d. in Savannah, Ga., 1807. He settled at St. Helena's Island, S.C. Served in S. C.; was taken prisoner but escaped from the prison ship at Charleston, S.C., and returned to his duties as Surgeon in the Continental Army. Married (1) Miss Martin; (2) Dorothy Phoebe Norton (dau. of Jonathan Norton and his wife Mary Ann Chaplin).
Children:
1. Esther, b. 1772; mar. PAT McKENZIE, served in the Md. Line REV. SOLDIER.
2. Elizabeth, mar. James Stoney.
3. Phoebe, mar. Joseph J. Lawton.
4. Jane, mar. Benjamin Themistocles Dion Lawton.
5. Mary, mar. ADAM FOWLER BRISBANE, REV. SOLDIER.
6. Martha, mar. Alexander J. Lawton.
7. Sarh, mar. Robert G. Norton.

NOTE; Closely connected with the Mosse family is the Lawton family of S.C.

Full Source Text

Roster of Revolutionary Soldiers in Georgia, Volume 1
Author: Howard H. McCall
Published: 1941; reprint, Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 2004.
GIDEON MALLETTE, b. Purysburg, S.C., June 14, 1759; d. Effingham Co., Ga., Sept. 3, 1822. Served under Gen. Francis Marion, S.C. Troops. Mar. 1783, HANNA ELIZABETH A. DE ROCHE (1767-1848).

Children:
1. Gideon, Jr.
2. Mary Ann.
3. Abraham (1790-1867), mar. Catherine Kennedy.
4. Daniel, mar. Susanna Zeigler.
5. Lewis
6. John Henry.
7. Margaret.
8. Jeremiah (1802-1865), mar. (1) Emma Metzger; (2) Mary Porter (dau. of William G. Porter).
9. Eliza M , mar. John William Exley.

Employment

Names in South Carolina
Author: Claude Henry Netiffer, editor
Published: 1972-1977; reprint, Spartanburg, South Carolina: The Reprint Company, Publishers, 1983.
p. 36 ...
On 16 Aug. 1698 John Bayley of Ballingclough, County Tipperary, Ireland, Landgrave and Caccique of Carolina, was granted by the Lords Proprietors Bayley's Barony (12,000 acres) which included most of Hilton Head Island other than land fronting on Port Royal Sound and on Skull Creek. Neither he, nor any of hi ...
XIX: 36.
On 16 Aug. 1698 John Bayley of Ballingclough, County Tipperary, Ireland, Landgrave and Caccique of Carolina, was granted by the Lords Proprietors Bayley's Barony (12,000 acres) which included most of Hilton Head Island other than land fronting on Port Royal Sound and on Skull Creek. Neither he, nor any of his family, ever visited Hilton Head Island. His son and heir, John Bayley, early in the eighteenth century appointed Alexander Trench as his agent for selling the property. Trench did make several sales of plantations, notably to Captain John Gascoigne and to Roger Moore. But the bulk of the Barony remained in the Bayley family until after the Revolutionary War. In 1783 Dr. George Mosse surveyed the Bayley holdings which then consisted of 47 tracts totalling 14,924 acres.

Full Source Text

Names in South Carolina
Author: Claude Henry Netiffer, editor
Published: 1972-1977; reprint, Spartanburg, South Carolina: The Reprint Company, Publishers, 1983.
p. 36 ...
On 16 Aug. 1698 John Bayley of Ballingclough, County Tipperary, Ireland, Landgrave and Caccique of Carolina, was granted by the Lords Proprietors Bayley's Barony (12,000 acres) which included most of Hilton Head Island other than land fronting on Port Royal Sound and on Skull Creek. Neither he, nor any of his family, ever visited Hilton Head Island. His son and heir, John Bayley, early in the eighteenth century appointed Alexander Trench as his agent for selling the property. Trench did make several sales of plantations, notably to Captain John Gascoigne and to Roger Moore. But the bulk of the Barony remained in the Bayley family until after the Revolutionary War. In 1783 Dr. George Mosse surveyed the Bayley holdings which then consisted of 47 tracts totalling 14,924 acres.

p. 45 ...

Dr. George Mosse (1742-1808) arrived in Carolina
by 1767, in 1771 marrying Dorothy Phoebe, daughter
of Jonathan Norton, Vestryman of St. Helena's Parish.
He practiced medicine, operated an extensive tannery
and leather business, planted grapes from which he
made sugar and wines, cane from which he made
sugar and rum, indigo and benne (or sesame, prized
for the valuable oil pressed from its seed). He served
as surgeon at the Battle of Camden, was captured
and imprisoned by the British aboard the Prison
Ships Torbay and Pack Horse in Charleston harbor.
After the War he surveyed what remained of Bayley's
Barony for further development by Benjamin Bayley
as agent for Henry Bayley, dividing its 14,924 acres
into 47 land lots or plantations. Shortly after 1790 he
moved his wife and seven daughters to a spacious
home on the southeast corner of Broughton and West
Broad Streets in Savannah where he conducted a
school for young ladies for several years. He was a
founding deacon of Savannah's First Baptist Church
in 1795. In 1807 he bought a plantation at Robertville
where several of his daughters lived and there both
he and his wife died and were buried in 1808. An
oil portrait of him is extant.

Residence

Names in South Carolina
Author: Claude Henry Netiffer, editor
Published: 1972-1977; reprint, Spartanburg, South Carolina: The Reprint Company, Publishers, 1983.
p. 36 ...
On 16 Aug. 1698 John Bayley of Ballingclough, County Tipperary, Ireland, Landgrave and Caccique of Carolina, was granted by the Lords Proprietors Bayley's Barony (12,000 acres) which included most of Hilton Head Island other than land fronting on Port Royal Sound and on Skull Creek. Neither he, nor any of hi ...
XIX: 45.

Full Source Text

Names in South Carolina
Author: Claude Henry Netiffer, editor
Published: 1972-1977; reprint, Spartanburg, South Carolina: The Reprint Company, Publishers, 1983.
p. 36 ...
On 16 Aug. 1698 John Bayley of Ballingclough, County Tipperary, Ireland, Landgrave and Caccique of Carolina, was granted by the Lords Proprietors Bayley's Barony (12,000 acres) which included most of Hilton Head Island other than land fronting on Port Royal Sound and on Skull Creek. Neither he, nor any of his family, ever visited Hilton Head Island. His son and heir, John Bayley, early in the eighteenth century appointed Alexander Trench as his agent for selling the property. Trench did make several sales of plantations, notably to Captain John Gascoigne and to Roger Moore. But the bulk of the Barony remained in the Bayley family until after the Revolutionary War. In 1783 Dr. George Mosse surveyed the Bayley holdings which then consisted of 47 tracts totalling 14,924 acres.

p. 45 ...

Dr. George Mosse (1742-1808) arrived in Carolina
by 1767, in 1771 marrying Dorothy Phoebe, daughter
of Jonathan Norton, Vestryman of St. Helena's Parish.
He practiced medicine, operated an extensive tannery
and leather business, planted grapes from which he
made sugar and wines, cane from which he made
sugar and rum, indigo and benne (or sesame, prized
for the valuable oil pressed from its seed). He served
as surgeon at the Battle of Camden, was captured
and imprisoned by the British aboard the Prison
Ships Torbay and Pack Horse in Charleston harbor.
After the War he surveyed what remained of Bayley's
Barony for further development by Benjamin Bayley
as agent for Henry Bayley, dividing its 14,924 acres
into 47 land lots or plantations. Shortly after 1790 he
moved his wife and seven daughters to a spacious
home on the southeast corner of Broughton and West
Broad Streets in Savannah where he conducted a
school for young ladies for several years. He was a
founding deacon of Savannah's First Baptist Church
in 1795. In 1807 he bought a plantation at Robertville
where several of his daughters lived and there both
he and his wife died and were buried in 1808. An
oil portrait of him is extant.

Religion

Names in South Carolina
Author: Claude Henry Netiffer, editor
Published: 1972-1977; reprint, Spartanburg, South Carolina: The Reprint Company, Publishers, 1983.
p. 36 ...
On 16 Aug. 1698 John Bayley of Ballingclough, County Tipperary, Ireland, Landgrave and Caccique of Carolina, was granted by the Lords Proprietors Bayley's Barony (12,000 acres) which included most of Hilton Head Island other than land fronting on Port Royal Sound and on Skull Creek. Neither he, nor any of hi ...
XIX: 45.

Full Source Text

Names in South Carolina
Author: Claude Henry Netiffer, editor
Published: 1972-1977; reprint, Spartanburg, South Carolina: The Reprint Company, Publishers, 1983.
p. 36 ...
On 16 Aug. 1698 John Bayley of Ballingclough, County Tipperary, Ireland, Landgrave and Caccique of Carolina, was granted by the Lords Proprietors Bayley's Barony (12,000 acres) which included most of Hilton Head Island other than land fronting on Port Royal Sound and on Skull Creek. Neither he, nor any of his family, ever visited Hilton Head Island. His son and heir, John Bayley, early in the eighteenth century appointed Alexander Trench as his agent for selling the property. Trench did make several sales of plantations, notably to Captain John Gascoigne and to Roger Moore. But the bulk of the Barony remained in the Bayley family until after the Revolutionary War. In 1783 Dr. George Mosse surveyed the Bayley holdings which then consisted of 47 tracts totalling 14,924 acres.

p. 45 ...

Dr. George Mosse (1742-1808) arrived in Carolina
by 1767, in 1771 marrying Dorothy Phoebe, daughter
of Jonathan Norton, Vestryman of St. Helena's Parish.
He practiced medicine, operated an extensive tannery
and leather business, planted grapes from which he
made sugar and wines, cane from which he made
sugar and rum, indigo and benne (or sesame, prized
for the valuable oil pressed from its seed). He served
as surgeon at the Battle of Camden, was captured
and imprisoned by the British aboard the Prison
Ships Torbay and Pack Horse in Charleston harbor.
After the War he surveyed what remained of Bayley's
Barony for further development by Benjamin Bayley
as agent for Henry Bayley, dividing its 14,924 acres
into 47 land lots or plantations. Shortly after 1790 he
moved his wife and seven daughters to a spacious
home on the southeast corner of Broughton and West
Broad Streets in Savannah where he conducted a
school for young ladies for several years. He was a
founding deacon of Savannah's First Baptist Church
in 1795. In 1807 he bought a plantation at Robertville
where several of his daughters lived and there both
he and his wife died and were buried in 1808. An
oil portrait of him is extant.

Land

Names in South Carolina
Author: Claude Henry Netiffer, editor
Published: 1972-1977; reprint, Spartanburg, South Carolina: The Reprint Company, Publishers, 1983.
p. 36 ...
On 16 Aug. 1698 John Bayley of Ballingclough, County Tipperary, Ireland, Landgrave and Caccique of Carolina, was granted by the Lords Proprietors Bayley's Barony (12,000 acres) which included most of Hilton Head Island other than land fronting on Port Royal Sound and on Skull Creek. Neither he, nor any of hi ...
XIX: 45.

Full Source Text

Names in South Carolina
Author: Claude Henry Netiffer, editor
Published: 1972-1977; reprint, Spartanburg, South Carolina: The Reprint Company, Publishers, 1983.
p. 36 ...
On 16 Aug. 1698 John Bayley of Ballingclough, County Tipperary, Ireland, Landgrave and Caccique of Carolina, was granted by the Lords Proprietors Bayley's Barony (12,000 acres) which included most of Hilton Head Island other than land fronting on Port Royal Sound and on Skull Creek. Neither he, nor any of his family, ever visited Hilton Head Island. His son and heir, John Bayley, early in the eighteenth century appointed Alexander Trench as his agent for selling the property. Trench did make several sales of plantations, notably to Captain John Gascoigne and to Roger Moore. But the bulk of the Barony remained in the Bayley family until after the Revolutionary War. In 1783 Dr. George Mosse surveyed the Bayley holdings which then consisted of 47 tracts totalling 14,924 acres.

p. 45 ...

Dr. George Mosse (1742-1808) arrived in Carolina
by 1767, in 1771 marrying Dorothy Phoebe, daughter
of Jonathan Norton, Vestryman of St. Helena's Parish.
He practiced medicine, operated an extensive tannery
and leather business, planted grapes from which he
made sugar and wines, cane from which he made
sugar and rum, indigo and benne (or sesame, prized
for the valuable oil pressed from its seed). He served
as surgeon at the Battle of Camden, was captured
and imprisoned by the British aboard the Prison
Ships Torbay and Pack Horse in Charleston harbor.
After the War he surveyed what remained of Bayley's
Barony for further development by Benjamin Bayley
as agent for Henry Bayley, dividing its 14,924 acres
into 47 land lots or plantations. Shortly after 1790 he
moved his wife and seven daughters to a spacious
home on the southeast corner of Broughton and West
Broad Streets in Savannah where he conducted a
school for young ladies for several years. He was a
founding deacon of Savannah's First Baptist Church
in 1795. In 1807 he bought a plantation at Robertville
where several of his daughters lived and there both
he and his wife died and were buried in 1808. An
oil portrait of him is extant.

Marriage

IGI
Author: www.familysearch.org